Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Daily Kid UU Spiritual Practice?

Today is the first day of summer break for the kids and I. We were so very ready for this!  We had the WHOLE day to just hang out and it was wonderful.  We had a slow morning and headed to the library to load up on reading material.  Since we weren't in a hurry, the kids played some chess and put together a "community" puzzle while we were there. The afternoon was spent reading, baking, playing instruments, games and taking the dogs on a walk.  Perfect.  While I know this won't be every day, it was a great way to start the summer.

Since life is slowing down, I would like to institute a low-key daily spiritual practice with the kids.  I have actually been wanting to do this for a long time, but things were so crazy busy, I couldn't find the time to figure it all out.  Which, in and of itself, is a strong indicator that this is something very needed. Problem is, I am at a loss for what to do. A daily reading? Lighting a chalice? Gratitude journal?  I would LOVE some ideas.  Have you ever done anything like this?  I am not looking for anything complicated, but something meaningful.  Please share!

4 comments:

Amy said...

I suggest saying grace. It can be very simple. We hold hands and say "Thank you for the food" in as many languages as the people at the table know (usually English, Spanish, and Cat). We may add anything else we feel particularly grateful for, and often make mention of the people who grew or cooked the food. It took very little time for our daughter to begin to contribute her own variations.

Unknown said...

My suggestion to is spend time outside every day. Find a "special place" and gather for a moment of gratitude - you can watch the change of seasons, etc.

Pat said...

I suggest spending time outdoors every day. Find a "special place" that you and your family can visit each day - express your gratitude and watch the changes large and small over the course of the seasons (you can also start a nature journal).

Liz said...

We light a chalice before supper and each person says what they're thankful for (sometimes also something that they hope). We talk and dish at the same time, or it gets too long... it's a lovely ritual--you learn so much about what is most important to your kids in the moment.